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  #1  
Old 12-17-2019, 06:15 AM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Kingsville, TX
Posts: 176
Default How does the RV slip?

I flew a flapless Citabria before buying a RV-3 and then a RV-4. I was using slipping a lot. Never really tried it with the RVs. The folks debating CS vs fixed pitch got me thinking.

When I was flying the Citabria the air speed indicator would reading accurately during a slip. Not so much on Cessna 150s and 172. The Citabria had pitot and static on the strut.

I now mostly fly the RV-4 with IO360, Hartzell CS, I want to explore slipping some. Any pitfalls to watch for. The Midway movie got me thinking.
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  #2  
Old 12-17-2019, 06:32 AM
fixnflyguy fixnflyguy is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Winston-Salem, N.C.
Posts: 1,204
Default Do it

I slip my -4 often, although the results are not as pronounced as my 46'BC12 did, similar to your Citabria. The -4 will drop like a rock if you get slow and slip, so be aware. I mostly do forward slips in the -4 when I am hot and need some braking action in the pattern.
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  #3  
Old 12-17-2019, 06:37 AM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 4,193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fixnflyguy View Post
I slip my -4 often, although the results are not as pronounced as my 46'BC12 did, similar to your Citabria. The -4 will drop like a rock if you get slow and slip, so be aware. I mostly do forward slips in the -4 when I am hot and need some braking action in the pattern.
Slips help, but IMO, like the previous poster said, th best way to really steepen your glide path in an RV is to get the flaps out and get slow. At 60 knots or less, my glide angle is steep. Add in a bit of a slip and it gets really steep. Obviously, something to get comfortable with at altitude first.
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  #4  
Old 12-17-2019, 06:39 AM
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Ed_Wischmeyer Ed_Wischmeyer is offline
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 1,297
Default

I've had an RV-4, fixed pitch, and an RV-8, constant speed. Both of them would do a good imitation of a brick in a slip, but in the -8, hardly necessary with full flaps and the constant speed. Lots of control authority at low speeds in both.

Go up to altitude and do some very aggressive slips, both directions, right up to stall so you get familiar with what the plane will do. You certainly don't want to depart controlled flight at low altitude, but my guess is that you'll have so much descent capability that you'll never need to get close to the limits.

And don't forget about your fuel selector in a prolonged slip cause you can unport the fuel pickup.
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  #5  
Old 12-17-2019, 06:51 AM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: 08A
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Ain't like a Cub, but it slips ok.

Something I've never checked at altitude; the scenario is minimum fuel in the selected tank, then slipping with that tank on the downhill side. Anyone unported the tank, and got a power interruption on short final?

I think most pilots typically slip to the same side every time, sort of like being right or left handed. If I anticipate a slip, I'll set up the feed on the right tank, because I usually slip to the left. I wonder if I'm being overly cautious.
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  #6  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:12 AM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Kingsville, TX
Posts: 176
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanH View Post
Ain't like a Cub, but it slips ok.

Something I've never checked at altitude; the scenario is minimum fuel in the selected tank, then slipping with that tank on the downhill side. Anyone unported the tank, and got a power interruption on short final?

I think most pilots typically slip to the same side every time, sort of like being right or left handed. If I anticipate a slip, I'll set up the feed on the right tank, because I usually slip to the left. I wonder if I'm being overly cautious.
I have a preferred side but I generally slipped in the same direction I would be using for my crosswind correction. The RV-4 with CS comes down like a brick with no power. Mostly curiousity.
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  #7  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:16 AM
luddite42 luddite42 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 447
Default

RVs just don't have the drag and large side area to exploit in a slip compared to rag and tube planes. RVs also run out of rudder well before the aileron in a slip. Slips help some, but the effect is quite weak compared to planes that really slip well such as J-3s, Stearmans, and Pitts.
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  #8  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:24 AM
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airguy airguy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Garden City, Tx
Posts: 5,094
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanH View Post
Ain't like a Cub, but it slips ok.

Something I've never checked at altitude; the scenario is minimum fuel in the selected tank, then slipping with that tank on the downhill side. Anyone unported the tank, and got a power interruption on short final?

I think most pilots typically slip to the same side every time, sort of like being right or left handed. If I anticipate a slip, I'll set up the feed on the right tank, because I usually slip to the left. I wonder if I'm being overly cautious.
I've tried that in my 9A and haven't yet unported a tank. I didn't get real enthusiastic about it though.
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Built an off-plan RV9A with too much fuel and too much HP. Should drop dead any minute now.
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  #9  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:29 AM
iwannarv iwannarv is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Olathe, KS
Posts: 394
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Used to fly an -8 off a 2000ft grass strip. Slipped virtually every landing, per primary instruction,
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  #10  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:30 AM
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scard scard is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cedar Park, TX
Posts: 3,143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by airguy View Post
I've tried that in my 9A and haven't yet unported a tank. I didn't get real enthusiastic about it though.
I've tinkered with a little bit of this testing, at altitude, and have unported the downhill tank. I forget the actual numbers but there was something like 2gal in that tank and the slip was most exceptionally enthusiastic .
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